April 1 Sedona, AZ

We drove down 89A from Holbrook; I had been to Sedona a few times over thirty years ago when I lived in Scottsdale, but never came down through Flagstaff route. We had beautiful weather as we meandered through the stunning red rocks that make you feel as though you down in the Grand Canyon, but lush with blue-green junipers, pine, brush and unspoiled alpine air.  The red rocks enhance the springtime flora; the lantana and cactus were blooming giving the land a deep sense of renewal.  It was so nice to be warm, but not hot.

We arrived at the Rancho Sedona RV Park that sits on Oak Creek with views of the surrounding buttes.  The park was emaculate with large sycamore trees that gave our surroundings an ethereal feel.  A heron flew by adding to my increasing sense of euphoria; they were nesting in a nearby tree.

The best RV park ever!

We were walking distance to the galleries and also to trailheads that sent us a bit off the beaten track.  It was quiet as we were pushed out just enough from the main hub with the creek displacing any road noise.

Sedona certainly is not the laid back town I remember, but like so much “progress,” they too are being hammered with tourists; the traffic was thick and I was glad we didn’t have to park anywhere to visit the galleries. 

We lucked out at the Creekside Restaurant with a seat outside and a lovely view of the surrounding buttes.

Lucky lunch spot – we couldn’t have scored a better seat!

The town has kept it’s beauty and you actually sense they fight for it – there aren’t really any big box stores here with most of the popular lines being curated by the local mom and pop shops – I love that.  The gas stations and grocery stores etc. are on the main drag out of town so as not do disrupt the center. 

Tlaquepaque Arts and Shopping Village was especially lovely with the rustic southwestern-style shops built around the giant sycamores and skirting Oak Creek.  The weather was in the 70’s – it was simply bucolic.  Despite the surge of humanity it felt well-kept and restrained.  

We saw the new age proprietors around town but they weren’t as pronounced as the galleries and boutiques.  I suppose I can understand the new age thing as the ether of this place has a very meditative quality to it; but simply embracing it is enough for me – I don’t need a psychic reading to appreciate my surroundings and life is a mystery to explore anyway.  

We had the added pleasure of catching up with the several Leisure Travel Van owners that had congregated creating our own vortex!  We bonded, drank wine, swapped stories, experiences and suggestions.  It was great to meet fellow nomads who just maybe will also visit us in France😍.

We curated art from some of the galleries, glad to find pieces within our budget as some of the art was well out of our range – it will be fun to unpack these gems in France and find them a permanent home.  

Wish we could have afforded this – I couldn’t stop drooling

Goodbye Sedona, you masterpiece on so many different levels. We are up early to Indian Cove Campground in Joshua Tree National Park – 350 some odd miles!   

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